When It Feels Like You’re Pushing A Rock Uphill

There’s a running gag in “It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia”.

One of the main characters keeps getting more and more fat in the name of “cultivating mass”.  He claims that he’s not obese, but muscular and strong.

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The reason the gag is funny is because there are so many people out there who claim they’re going to the gym, that they’re eating a healthy diet, that they’re fit.  But in reality they’re still their usual, unhealthy self.

This self-deception seems to come from adopting habits which superficially look like they should lead to a healthier self.  But whereas “Dry January” and grabbing a protein shake from time to time may seem like healthy habits, they often don’t lead to any significant changes in health and well-being.

When you try to reach a goal, whether that be in business or in life, it’s easy to fill your time up with actions which may seem helpful.  Many founders of companies are guilty of this.  They go to “conventions”, to “networking events”, they meet investors “just in case” they need to raise money.  It’s easy to fill your time up with stuff instead of doing the important work which will get s*%t done.

But how to decide what is worth your time and what isn’t?  I think it comes down to this:

Speed ≠ Velocity

The higher the speed, the more it may seem like you’re doing productive work.  But what happens if your speed is in the wrong direction?  What happens if you’re trying to get to London, but you end up in Leeds?

In physics, speed with a direction is called “Velocity”*.  

When you’re trying to get s*%t done, velocity and not mere speed is what counts!

The three points to remember when you’re trying to achieve something are:

  1. When you undertake a specific action you have to be able to measure the specific outputs you are hoping to see.  What specifically were you hoping to achieve by doing actions X, Y and Z?  If there isn’t a measurable, observable, repeatable outcome then it could be that you’re simply wasting your time.
  2. If you do a specific task, which leads to a measurable, observable, repeatable outcome then you’re not wasting your time.
  3. It then follows that if you modify or change your specific task, you will be able to achieve different outcomes if you wish.

So the questions of the day are; What are the tasks that fill up your day?  And what are the outcomes you are hoping to achieve with those tasks?

*Velocity is therefore considered a “Vector” in physics, i.e. movement with a direction.

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Screw That! Do The Opposite!!

Apple it seems, is a bit greedy.  They want you to ditch your old iPhone for a shinier, new version.  They do this by pushing updates that reduce the battery life of older iPhone’s and make them run slower.

The other day I saw a classic Rolls Royce drive past me.

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It was a thing of beauty.  As it drove by everyone was staring at this majestic work of art.

This made me think:

There are very few things which get better with time*.

I find it sad that so few things are built to last.  

In fact nowadays, “planned obsolescence” – where products are designed to break after a period of time – is part of the plan so that people will upgrade or buy more of the same products.

This sort of impatience and nearsightedness doesn’t do anyone any favours and yet it seems to be affecting people’s thinking when it comes to all sorts of things.

People even talk about “flipping businesses”!  As soon as they start a business they’re looking for an “exit” to literally get out.

Screw that!

Do the opposite!

Instead of looking for a way to get out, plant deep roots.

Instead of “flipping a business”, serve your customers for the long-term.

Instead of making sure your product breaks, make something that gets better with time.

If you as a freelancer, an artist, a writer an entrepreneur can lean in when others bow out, then there will always be people out there who would like to be served by you.

*Off the top of my head I can only think of a few things which get better with time; old recipes, certain watches, certain cars, fine wines, art, nature….

I Can Guarantee Something That Will Never Ever Change And It’s Where To Find All The Opportunities.

There’s an old business story about a cookie factory owner.

Cookie

His company was making millions of cookies and was very profitable.  However, his board was always asking for more profits.

One day the cookie factory owner thought of a great idea!  “What if we got rid of 1 of the 13 spices we put in the cookie?  No one will probably realise and our expenses will go down!”.

He tried it out and got rid of one of the ingredients.  None of his customers realised and the boards profits and margins improved!

He went on to have another idea: “Well, no one realised that the cookie now only uses 12 spices.  Why don’t we get rid of another spice?”.

This went on for a while and at some point his cookie sales started to dwindle.  People just weren’t interested any more.  The cookie owner tried to recover, but his brand was permanently tarnished and due to the new way the cookies were being manufactured the business didn’t recover and he went out of business.

Here’s the thing.  Often things change, but really slowly.  Each small increment of change is not noticeable, but at some point when you stand back and observe, you’ll notice that the landscape has drastically changed.

The one thing I can guarantee will never change, is that everything will change.

When things change, new opportunities arise.  But the places where change occurs the most is at “the edges”, not the mainstream.

The mainstream ends up following “the edges”.

Donald Trump & Brexit

I have a confession to make.  I didn’t follow Donald Trump’s election campaign throughout 2016, which lead to his election in 2017.

I remember waking up in the morning when it was announced that he had won.  I didn’t think anything of it, but when I got to work there seemed to be some kind of mass hysteria which had overtaken everyone.  My disinterest has continued since his election and my life hasn’t changed in any way since before he was elected.

I have another confession to make.  I didn’t follow anything to do with Brexit, which resulted in the United Kingdom announcing that they would leave the European Union.  Once again, since Brexit has been announced, my life has not changed in any way.

Now, what I’m not saying is that these two events don’t matter, will never have an impact on me and on others.  But my observation is that both of these events were unpredictable and unexpected.

Election campaigns are like “The Edge” of a given field.

“The Edge”, as I define it is the place where change is rapid, where present data does not correlate with outcomes and where if you play your cards right you can gain massively from disorder by creating and innovating.

The reason why there was and is mass hysteria surrounding Trump’s election and around Brexit is because the mass population is not used to “The Edge”.  The mainstream lives in a world where change is slow, where change makes some kind of sense, where change happens to you.  

The Edge

When things hit the mainstream, the opportunities you get exposed to will be incremental in nature.

When you get to “The Edge”, opportunities aren’t incremental, they aren’t even exponential, they’re of a whole new category.

Think of a couple of the current buzzwords in the medical world at the moment: “automation” and “robotics”.

You’ll get visions of futuristic robots with lasers carrying out the work of surgeons.

ironman

I will use always every opportunity I have to stick in an Iron Man jpg into my blog posts.

To the mainstream surgeons – the typical surgeon working in small general hospitals – robotics and automation seems like several decades away, or it may be that they think robotics will never hit the mainstream.

And this is the point of this essay once again:

The one thing I can guarantee that will never change, is that everything will change.  And when change happens the people who were the main players at “The Edge” win.

Say for example that you were doing “mainstream” open heart surgery in the early 2000’s.  By the early 2000’s heart surgery was already kind of figured out.  Any further improvements since then have been incremental in nature.

“The Edge”, at this time was actually the move to minimally invasive surgery.  This is where you can operate on the heart by creating a tiny incision on a patients thigh and then introducing some instruments into the main blood vessels of the leg.  These instruments are then navigated towards the heart where you can carry out procedures such as angioplasties and valve replacement procedures.

The minimally invasive techniques have a faster recovery rate, are cheaper and increasingly have better outcomes in every respect in comparison to open heart surgery.

Being at “The Edge” at the time when minimally invasive surgery was being developed would have provided all the opportunities that people often look for – it would have allowed the innovators to have their say on how to perform procedures, to pioneer new techniques, to develop new instruments and tools which you could build a new business around etc.

Yes, “The Edge” may sound crazy, it may be exclusive, the odds of a lot of new technologies causing a dent in the world may be random or low, but nonetheless it is still where change occurs and where opportunities live.