I Can Guarantee Something That Will Never Ever Change And It’s Where To Find All The Opportunities.

There’s an old business story about a cookie factory owner.

Cookie

His company was making millions of cookies and was very profitable.  However, his board was always asking for more profits.

One day the cookie factory owner thought of a great idea!  “What if we got rid of 1 of the 13 spices we put in the cookie?  No one will probably realise and our expenses will go down!”.

He tried it out and got rid of one of the ingredients.  None of his customers realised and the boards profits and margins improved!

He went on to have another idea: “Well, no one realised that the cookie now only uses 12 spices.  Why don’t we get rid of another spice?”.

This went on for a while and at some point his cookie sales started to dwindle.  People just weren’t interested any more.  The cookie owner tried to recover, but his brand was permanently tarnished and due to the new way the cookies were being manufactured the business didn’t recover and he went out of business.

Here’s the thing.  Often things change, but really slowly.  Each small increment of change is not noticeable, but at some point when you stand back and observe, you’ll notice that the landscape has drastically changed.

The one thing I can guarantee will never change, is that everything will change.

When things change, new opportunities arise.  But the places where change occurs the most is at “the edges”, not the mainstream.

The mainstream ends up following “the edges”.

Donald Trump & Brexit

I have a confession to make.  I didn’t follow Donald Trump’s election campaign throughout 2016, which lead to his election in 2017.

I remember waking up in the morning when it was announced that he had won.  I didn’t think anything of it, but when I got to work there seemed to be some kind of mass hysteria which had overtaken everyone.  My disinterest has continued since his election and my life hasn’t changed in any way since before he was elected.

I have another confession to make.  I didn’t follow anything to do with Brexit, which resulted in the United Kingdom announcing that they would leave the European Union.  Once again, since Brexit has been announced, my life has not changed in any way.

Now, what I’m not saying is that these two events don’t matter, will never have an impact on me and on others.  But my observation is that both of these events were unpredictable and unexpected.

Election campaigns are like “The Edge” of a given field.

“The Edge”, as I define it is the place where change is rapid, where present data does not correlate with outcomes and where if you play your cards right you can gain massively from disorder by creating and innovating.

The reason why there was and is mass hysteria surrounding Trump’s election and around Brexit is because the mass population is not used to “The Edge”.  The mainstream lives in a world where change is slow, where change makes some kind of sense, where change happens to you.  

The Edge

When things hit the mainstream, the opportunities you get exposed to will be incremental in nature.

When you get to “The Edge”, opportunities aren’t incremental, they aren’t even exponential, they’re of a whole new category.

Think of a couple of the current buzzwords in the medical world at the moment: “automation” and “robotics”.

You’ll get visions of futuristic robots with lasers carrying out the work of surgeons.

ironman

I will use always every opportunity I have to stick in an Iron Man jpg into my blog posts.

To the mainstream surgeons – the typical surgeon working in small general hospitals – robotics and automation seems like several decades away, or it may be that they think robotics will never hit the mainstream.

And this is the point of this essay once again:

The one thing I can guarantee that will never change, is that everything will change.  And when change happens the people who were the main players at “The Edge” win.

Say for example that you were doing “mainstream” open heart surgery in the early 2000’s.  By the early 2000’s heart surgery was already kind of figured out.  Any further improvements since then have been incremental in nature.

“The Edge”, at this time was actually the move to minimally invasive surgery.  This is where you can operate on the heart by creating a tiny incision on a patients thigh and then introducing some instruments into the main blood vessels of the leg.  These instruments are then navigated towards the heart where you can carry out procedures such as angioplasties and valve replacement procedures.

The minimally invasive techniques have a faster recovery rate, are cheaper and increasingly have better outcomes in every respect in comparison to open heart surgery.

Being at “The Edge” at the time when minimally invasive surgery was being developed would have provided all the opportunities that people often look for – it would have allowed the innovators to have their say on how to perform procedures, to pioneer new techniques, to develop new instruments and tools which you could build a new business around etc.

Yes, “The Edge” may sound crazy, it may be exclusive, the odds of a lot of new technologies causing a dent in the world may be random or low, but nonetheless it is still where change occurs and where opportunities live.

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It All Starts With An Idea

Two fish swam past one another. One turns to the other and says:

“The water’s nice today isn’t it?”

After a few minutes the second fish thought to himself:

“What’s water???”

Ideas are valuable. Ideas are the birthplace of innovation, entrepreneurship and value creation.

The problem in today’s world is that many ideas go unquestioned for so long that we forget that we can even question them. The fact is that opportunity surrounds us all if we only take a closer look and examine things a bit deeper.

In this respect we’re all swimming in opportunity, but just like that fish we may be blind to it.

There’s another problem. New ideas, heterodox ideas, the ones that at first instance seem a bit weird are often dismissed too quickly. They aren’t allowed to grow and mature, because just like anything else, ideas change over time and often get better.

So the key is to not only question what already is, but allow new ideas a chance by not interrogating them too much, but exploring them fully.

Ideas Come First

For some reason there is a notion that “science” generates ideas, that science provides the means to bring about spectacular new innovations.

But, it isn’t and never will be.  Science is a method to prove or disprove a theory.  The theory or idea itself came from a person who had a hunch.

I sometimes tell my patients a story about stomach ulcers.  It used to be thought that ulcers could never be caused by bacteria living in the stomach.  The whole scientific community found it preposterous that an organism would be able to live in the stomach and cause ulcers to form.

An Australian doctor had the complete opposite idea.  He had the idea that a bug* could indeed cause stomach ulcers and that a simple course of antibiotics could prevent people needing more invasive operations and reduce the chances of people developing stomach cancer if promptly treated.

“everyone was against me, but I knew I was right.” – Dr Barry Marshall

He used the scientific method to prove himself right – by infecting himself with the bacteria and treating himself.  He went on to win the Nobel Prize in medicine for his work.

How To Know If You’ve Got A Good Idea

I can’t figure out how to develop ideas.  Phrases such as “solve a problem”, don’t quite seem to do the job.

The reason is that “problems” aren’t clearly defined.  Problems – the type that actually matter and are therefore the most valuable are fuzzy and yet to be defined.  So framing a problem in and of itself is very difficult.

The other thing is that to really solve a problem requires you to have an opinion, a view of how things are or should be.  Like Dr Barry Marshall, you need to develop a point of view and then have the balls to stick by it and see it through to the end.

This is very rare indeed.

It is very rare to meet someone who has thought deeply about an issue and come to a conclusion which is unique and well thought out.  Most people not only allow others to define the discussion or the problem, but they rely on other people to provide the solution and thought process behind the reasoning.

I have noticed that if you do have an idea, the best way to figure out if it is a good one, is to put it to the test.  Implement it in the real world and see what happens.  It won’t be perfect and it will get altered, modified and changed** as time goes on and as it comes into contact with resistance.  But if all the signs point to the idea being robust then you owe it to yourself and the world to see it through.

*Helicobacter pylori

** There is an idea called “Hegelian Aufheben” which says that when some ideas come into contact with an opposing idea it is not destroyed.  Nor does the original idea destroy the opposing idea.  There are situations where the opposing ideas enrich each other and they both get better, stronger and more robust.

This Is Why You’re Wrong About The Future Of The NHS

The large majority of the public don’t know anything about health and therefore healthcare provision.

The majority of journalists and politicians who write and speak about the NHS don’t know anything about working in healthcare and therefore the realities of delivering healthcare to actual patients.

If these two statements are true, then it’s safe to say that most people don’t have a real grasp of the actual problems faced by modern healthcare and where we’re heading.

What You’re Told

The public discourse always revolves around the same lines.

The left always ask for more funding as this would provide the public with more doctors, more hospital beds, more access to cancer treatments and so on.

The right, while not necessarily for privatisation, generally don’t like the idea of paying ever more taxes when the are so many inefficiencies in the healthcare system, when the country has a lot of debt and when people (immigrants etc) who they deem should not have access to the NHS are using up its resources.

Here’s the thing. Both of these stances are not addressing the problems the NHS is facing.  The demand in healthcare has been growing at an insane rate (some estimates state that healthcare demands have increased by 50% over the last decade) and will continue to increase. Therefore if we were to hypothetically provide all the funding needed to provide optimal healthcare for everyone and we were able to satiate this need right now, we would still end up in the same situation as now just a few years later.

It is important to realise that no country or system in the world has managed to solve the problem of healthcare provision.  All healthcare systems around the world are facing imminent disaster as the demand is growing at such a fast pace, so to say that either providing more funding or reducing inefficiencies would make much of a difference is wrong.

Re-defining The Question

It is often said that if you are given an hour to solve a problem, that you should spend the first fifty-five minutes defining the problem.

I think instead of asking the question: “What can the NHS do?” a better question would be “What should the NHS do?”.

The NHS is treating people mainly for conditions which are a result of poor lifestyle choices. Diabetes, hypertension, COPD, cancers, osteoarthritis (due to being obese), anxiety, depression and so on are all largely due to poor lifestyle choices. If hypothetically the NHS had all the money in the world, we would still end up with a society of over medicated diseased, unproductive people. Is this what we should be aiming for?

The fact is that the only solution for the future of health is not new technology, AI, new medications etc to treat the ill, it’s actually getting patients to take responsibility for their own health by leading a healthy lifestyle.  The only way to meet demand is to reduce demand, by reducing the number of ill people.

The problem with this solution is that it puts the onus of health back on patients.  I cannot see any politician or person in power really trying to push for this.  The backlash would be career suicide.  There would be a public outcry if this was talked about seriously.  I would imagine that a lot of patients would start to blame their circumstances for their poor lifestyle choices and demand that the government take responsibility and provide support for patients to make sure that they don’t develop chronic diseases.

This leads you to think that perhaps we shouldn’t be asking “What can the government do for public health”, but we should be asking “What should the government do for public health”.  This is where the debate needs to be.  How much personal responsibility should we all take for our own health?  And what would this type of society look like?

Things Your Doctor Can’t Do…

Maybe one day I’ll hang this list in the waiting room of my clinic:

  • I can’t cure your cold 
  • I can’t give you antibiotics for your cold
  • I can’t give you antibiotics for your flu
  • I can’t give you antibiotics for your diarrhoea of two days 
  • I can’t give you antibiotics for sinus congestion
  • I can’t give you morphine for your back pain
  • I can’t cure your back pain if you don’t lose weight
  • I can’t help you lose weight if you don’t eat right and exercise
  • I can’t help you with your diabetes if you don’t lose weight, exercise and eat right
  • I can’t help you with your high blood pressure if you don’t lose weight, exercise and eat right
  • I can’t help you with your chronic pain if you don’t lose weight, exercise and eat right
  • I can’t help you if you lie and say you are exercising and eating right
  • I can’t help you with recurrent chest infections if you keep smoking
  • I can’t reverse your Lung Cancer which was a result of your smoking
  • I can’t cure your depression / anxiety if you aren’t trying your very best to lead a life based on honourable work, forming meaningful social relationships, exercise and eating right

Life Isn’t Fair, But If You Don’t Get This Simple Point You’ll Always Be A Sucker

Life is very unfair.  As much as we all wish that the success we enjoy in life is a direct consequence of our well thought out actions and intentions, it probably isn’t.  If you were born poor in rural Bangladesh, could you still confidently say that your quality of life would be as good as it is now?

You’re not pretty enough, thin enough, tall enough, rich enough, you were born to poor parents, you went to a bad school, you were born in the wrong part of the country, you’re the wrong colour…This list of excuses is endless.  It’s undeniable that these characteristics and ones upbringing does indeed have a large impact on your life’s trajectory.

This post isn’t about “victimhood”.  Everyone is aware that you have to hustle to get ahead in life and that without hours of hard work, you simply won’t get anywhere.

This post also isn’t about being “stoic” and just accepting that you can work hard, toil away and yet still achieve very little in life.

This post is about how we can embrace the randomness and entropy that surrounds us every day and use it to our advantage.  In short, this post will teach you how to win at life.  But first, a few illustrations are necessary.

Estimated Time of Arrival

Google Maps has replaced my Sat Nav machine.  I don’t know when it happened, but it definitely beats using a stand alone machine.  I was particularly put off using stand alone Sat Navs ever since someone broke into my car to steal one!  The burglar probably sold it for £20 at the local pawn shop, but left me with a repair bill of £120 for my car.

A few days a week I make a 60 mile commute to my clinic to see patients and make sure everything is running properly.  Get in the car, put my phone in my phone holding thingy and set the destination; “Estimated time of arrival 10.30AM”, it says.

It seems that Google Maps and lots of other navigation apps try to figure out the “quickest route to destination”.  We’ve all probably had instances where we’ve put the navigation on in a familiar neighbourhood and have blindly followed its instructions, even though we just know that if we went our usual route we would have gotten to our destination quicker.

This minor gripe is merely annoying, but the worst kind of problem with Sat Navs is when we go on those longer journeys.  “Estimated time of arrival 10.30AM”, it says, but why is it that most of the time I get to my clinic a few minutes after the ETA?  The worst is when something unforeseen happens, such as an accident on the motorway and I end up at my destination an hour or more late!

Why is it that I never get to my destination an hour or more early?

In England we have roads called “M” roads, which are the largest roads with the highest speed limits.  We then have other major types of roads such as “A” roads and “B” roads.  As you can imagine “A” roads are the next quickest after “M” roads.  Interestingly enough, Sat Nav systems always tend to pick routes with “M” roads whenever possible.

This is an interesting way to get to your destination.  “M” roads are definitely faster, but if there is an accident, then you’re doomed to suffer hours stuck in traffic wondering why that annoying Audi behind you is driving so close when there’s clearly a traffic jam ahead.

“A” roads on the other hand have plenty of tributary roads.  Traffic jam?  No problem, just turn off and join another road and you’ll be on our way with a merely slight delay.

Satellite navigation systems are missing out on a trick in my opinion.  Instead of being able to pick the “fastest route” it should actually give you two options;  “Fastest route, but if something happens on the road you’ll be REALLY late” or “Slower route, but you don’t need to worry about being too late if something goes wrong.”

I wonder how many people would choose the slower route with less variability when it comes to important journeys such as getting to the airport on time to catch a flight?

The Doctor-Patient Relationship

When I used to work as an acute general surgical doctor, we used to quip that it would be more cost effective to carry out a whole body CT scan as patients were carted on to the ward.  Almost, like those body scans at the airport!  It certainly would have made our lives as doctors much easier if we could simply just get the scan done and see whether there was something worrying to operate on straight away, instead of having to sit down with the patient and get their history.

The acute surgical ward was a stressful place to work.  Patients got referred in by the Emergency Department or Community Doctors and then we had to assess the patients and figure out if they needed an emergency operation.

The problem on this ward was that it meant you would have to spend at least 30-40 minutes with the patient, listening to their story, taking blood tests and then you’d have to wait for several hours for the blood tests to come back.  Once the blood tests were back, unless it was an obvious appendicitis or cholecystitis, you would have to organise a CT scan.  If you consider that many patients end up staying in the hospital overnight at a cost of £400, only to be told the following morning that all the investigations were normal and that they can go home, then having a CT scanner placed at the door doesn’t sound like a bad idea as a scan costs around £100 per patient.

You might be thinking that all these tests sound totally unnecessary.  I would agree with you.  The problem in medicine is that when a patient gets referred to you by another doctor, the onus falls on the accepting physician to ensure that nothing is wrong.  In other words the buck stops with you.

What do physicians with this onus do?  Test, test, test!  Do all the blood tests under the sun.  Does this patient actually sound like she has a simple urinary tract infection which can be treated with three days of oral antibiotics?  Doesn’t matter!  We can’t risk it!  We must do all the blood tests which will make sure her bowels, kidneys, liver, pancreas, anaemia levels are all normal and if these all come back normal then she must have a scan of her abdomen as well (exposing her to more than 500 times the radiation of a chest x-ray) to just be safe.

How did medicine get this way?  There seemed to have been a simpler time in medicine, which I personally didn’t get to experience.  My father on the other hand reminisces about those times frequently.  “There used to be a time where doctors were respected and decisions were made mutually with the patient”.  I, unfortunately have been trained and continue to practice medicine in an era of litigation and suspicion.

The threat of litigation and the risk of potentially losing your medical licence with every patient you see causes you to practice medicine a lot more “defensively”.  Even if doing more is potentially harmful, it is often better to be seen to do something (which is defensible in court) than not carrying out an intervention (which is indefensible).  “We might as well as take out that gentleman’s appendix, just in case.”.  If you don’t take out the appendix and then it does turn out to be an appendicitis, then set aside a date for court my friend.

Is This a Good Idea??!!

“Is this a good idea”.  Every budding entrepreneur mutters those words.  Usually, so often that it drives loved ones near to the edge of sanity.

When they ask “is this a good idea?”, what thy are really asking is “will I make tons of money from this?!”.  Many entrepreneurs say ideas don’t mean a thing, but that the execution of the idea is the main thing.  I agree with this sentiment….to a certain extent.  If the person I’m talking to isn’t an action taker, then for definite it doesn’t matter what idea he has, because they’ll never do anything.  Ideas by themselves are meaningless.  But, if I’m talking to a really smart person, who consistently takes action, then yes ideas do matter.

The number of businesses is growing every year.  What’s interesting is how few are successful and how little money most businesses make.  I mean they’re all businesses after all and a lot of them do pretty much the same thing, but why is there such a large difference in revenue between them?

Why is Starbucks so profitable while that small cafe ran by that pleasant family down the road is struggling to make ends meet?

Or better yet, why will that coffee store never become the next Google?  Now obviously, Google are providing a completely different service, but what are the factors that set apart your average family run coffee store to an Internet company based in San Francisco?

The anatomy of a good idea goes a long way to explain whether an idea is worth pursuing or not.

The World Is More Random Than You Realise

The world is a very random place.  We as human beings are predisposed to create narratives to help us make sense of the world.  It gives us the feeling that we can predict the future.  Daniel Kahneman, the Nobel Prize winner, has written about how our brains are wired this way.

I remember when I was in high school and my music teacher played a piece of music to me.  It was a recording of a flute playing random notes, in a random order, with no time signature.  What was interesting about listening to this totally random barrage of notes was how my brain couldn’t help but construct melodies out of thin air.  It was the musical equivalent of “don’t think of a purple elephant!”.  Your mind will construct thoughts automatically and come to conclusions as a reflex.

Apart from my own anecdotes, there have been many studies which have proved how truly random the world is and how poor, we as humans are at predicting outcomes and making decisions.

Philip Tetlock, from the University of Pennsylvania made a landmark study: “Expert Political Judgement: How Good Is It?  Can We Know?”.  In this study he asked 284 political experts to make 80,000 predictions.  In the study he gave the political experts a topic to consider and then gave them three options to choose from.  He later looked at if the predictions were correct.

The experts turned out to be worse than random.  Meaning that if he had gotten a monkey to randomly pick an answer, the predictions would have been more accurate.  One of the reasons that expert predictors get it wrong so often seems to be a result of knowing too much.  Experts seem to over complicate their predictions by looking at too many factors and making too many outlandish correlations.

For business owners / CEO’s and entrepreneurs, the news isn’t too great either.  I love entrepreneur books and biographies of successful people.  But they do for the most part seem more like fairy tales, rather than scientific studies of success.  Which is fine if you’re into that sort of thing.  However, studies have shown that the strength of a CEO and the success of the company that they are running are not well correlated at all.

If CEO’s were really the rock stars they are made out to be in the popular press then there should be a direct correlation between the success of their companies and their skill level.  If you took a really bad CEO running a company in a certain industry and then took a really good CEO running a company in the same industry, you should expect to find that the better CEO’s company is always outperforming the one ran by the worse CEO.  But the correlation hardly exists!  If the correlation was perfect (i.e. a good CEO always producing the best outcomes and beating the competition) then the correlation coefficient would be 1.  In reality, the best estimates place the coefficient at around 0.3, which is only very slightly better than random!

My point is that skill and knowledge clearly exist, but the world is an incredibly random place.  Most people’s ability to make decisions affecting their future are random at best and worse than average at worst.

How To Not Be A Sucker

What do motorways, being an acute surgical doctor and good business ideas have in common?  One word: asymmetry.

Asymmetry means that there is an unequal relationship present.  To compound this, as the world is so random and unpredictable, you never know when the asymmetry is going to hit you and how much of an impact it will have in your life.

Motorways for example have an asymmetry in terms of getting to your destination on time.  Either you’ll be a little early, on time or if something goes wrong on the roads, such as an accident, then you’ll be extremely late i.e. an asymmetry is present here.

In the world of medicine / surgery, there is an asymmetrical relationship between the physician and the patient.  Theoretically if a doctor makes a mistake with any patient they ever see, they can lose their medical licence.  Patients may genuinely come to harm in some cases, however in the UK, the GMC (General Medical Council) have stated that over 90% patient of complaints / litigation made by patients is unwarranted and unfounded.  There is an asymmetry in the relationship as patients can make a complaint which may be false, but there are no repercussions if their complaint is found to be based on a lie.  Patients do not get any financial repercussions or penalties if their complaint doesn’t get upheld.

These asymmetries exist in a lot of different domains in life.  For whatever reason most people are blind to this and are unaware of such relationships.  But if you are aware of these relationships it will cause you to make better decisions.

The two examples we’ve talked about above are what I call negative asymmetries.  Meaning that if a random even occurs then it will make your life worse.  But, you can also use asymmetries to your advantage!

Take for example business ideas.  Good business ideas have asymmetries present which could result in exponential / unlimited financial returns.  Most business owners simply aren’t aware of these principles.  This is the reason why that small coffee store down your road will always continue to struggle and why that pleasant family will never be financially free – even though they could be.

I could speak a lot about great business ideas, but the two main principles in good business ideas are the ability to scale and detach your own time from your business.

Say that you open a coffee store.  Part of your business mission should be to put systems and protocols in place so that every cup of coffee is produced in the same way at the same standard, the store should always be cleaned in the same way up to a certain standard, the way items are procured and how much they should cost should be standardised, the way customers are greeted and treated should be standardised.

Basically every aspect of the business should be run with protocols in place.  This way, if you, the business owner decide to leave for a couple of months for a holiday, your business will keep on chugging along as usual.  In other words, you’ve created a system which is not attached to your time or presence – you’ve just created a money printing machine, which is exactly what businesses are meant to be.

If you can detach your time from your business, then inevitably you have created a business model that is scalable.  There is no reason why you can’t open up another coffee store usinng the exact same training protocols you have already created in your first store to expand your empire.

Business success is random as we have already demonstrated.  But, if you have a well thought out business which can be scaled then randomness can have a positive impact on your business and life.  As businesses which are designed to scale have asymmetrical returns then you could win big and be financially free.

In life if you don’t set yourself up to win and use randomness to your advantage, then you will always be at the mercy of randomness and asymetries.  You will always lose and be a sucker.

NHS Startup Part XVII – The End

Gosh, it’s been a long time since I posted about my startup.

I’ve decided that this will be the last blog post which talks about the minutiae of my startup and the challenges a new company in the healthcare scene has to face in the UK.

The reason this will be the last update is because the specifics of my startup are not helpful to other entrepreneurs / healthcare innovators out there.  The fact is that everyone will have to traverse a terrain which is different and face challenges which are different.  This I have come to realise is why so much advice surrounding entrepreneurship is so general.

“Solve a problem”

“Expect the unexpected”

“Provide value”

“Make connections”

These platitudes may seem clichéd and obvious, but they are cliched for a reason – it’s the truth and giving advice more specific is often not relevant or helpful.

Having said that here’s another update!

I Am a GP Partner Now

GP partners are owners of clinics in the UK.

This is a very privileged position I am in.  Basically I now have a test bed to test my application in.  I also have an allocation of money from the practice to keep building my app.  So, I am very lucky indeed to be have been given such a massive opportunity.

This is the best position a founder could be in!  Solving your own problem with outcomes which will be beneficial to yourself validates your idea for a business and ensures that at least one person will benefit from your product or service!

Keep in mind that 88% of founders fail because they fail to make something that people really want and will pay for.

To Spread or Not to Spread

The app is being used in a few test beds now.  As such I haven’t pushed for it to go into more and more healthcare settings.

The reasons for this is that the app has potential to become really killer.  But I need time to build the rest of the necessary features.  This will take 8 months or so.

It may seem risky to not keep pushing for it to go into more and more places, but there are a number of reasons why  think it’s a good idea to not spread to quickly in the healthcare space.

The first is that it’s very difficult to get into anywhere – but now that I am convinced that I will be able to get into more places, I need to make sure to not blow it by providing bad services or a crappy product.

The other reason is that when you’re creating enterprise software, the app itself is a small part of the whole business.  This is another reason why it’s a bad idea to learn to code just to make a business.  The fact is that people don’t just pay for an app (particularly in healthcare), but infrastructure, support, insurance, certification, governance etc etc.  Also, as you provide software to more settings and businesses, more code needs to be written to provide infrastructure for billing, handling new data and new protocols have to be written for implementation.  The legal implications and finances also becomes a whole lot more complicated.

Looking at it this way, I’ve figured that the best way to go forward is to really make an awesome product, get sales lined up and then launch in more places once we’re happy that we can deliver something remarkable.

The Future

The future looks good at this point.  I’m solving a real problem, we have customers, the scope of the app could make a really positive change for both patients and healthcare providers.

There will be plenty of challenges up ahead.  However, just because I’m not writing these in-depth updates doesn’t mean much for followers of the blog.

The fact is that anyone who really wants to do what I am doing can just read my blog and follow me.  As the whole blog is about entrepreneurship and healthcare, people will learn a lot more by reading and understanding the general view-point of an entrepreneur than to follow all the details closely.

Because let’s face it, how many other people out there are GP Partners and creating software for the NHS?

Everyone Should Be On Statins!

This is the mantra of the medical profession.

When I am seeing patients basically every man over the age of 60 and every woman over the age of 75 is advised to be started on a statin.  The algorithms on my computer (anyone with a QRISK2 score over 10% is advised to start on a statin as per the national guidelines) tell me to give it to them.

It seems that every few weeks there is a news article singing the benefits of taking statins.

Just to step back for a moment.  Statins are a group of medications which lower cholesterol.  Lowering cholesterol, it seems is associated with lowering the risk of death from a heart attack or a stroke.  Statins have always been controversial as such a large number of people are advised to take these medications.

I think statins are a perfect example of a drug class which has a lot of evidence espousing its benefits but little evidence showing that it may be harmful.  As I wrote in my previous blog post, the absence of evidence is not the same as evidence of absence.

The fact is that studies will show that statins “cut the risk of having a heart attack by X%”, but the hidden side effects and long term health disadvantages are not measured and in a lot of cases cannot be measured.

For example are statins associated with breast cancer?  Are they associated with bowel cancer?  Does it increase the likelihood of other diseases such as diabetes?  How about if you’re already a diabetic, does it make your diabetic retinopathy worse than if you weren’t on a statin and cause earlier blindness?

None of these questions have answers and they never will have an answer until it becomes painfully obvious as drug companies and the scientific community will always go looking for evidence which should result in treatment.

What do I do with my patients?  I explain that guidelines advise that they should be on a statin as it may decrease their chances of a heart attack or a stroke.  But I also tell them of the possible listed side effects and also explain that “all medications have side effects and risks which vary from person to person” and that if he/ she doesn’t want to continue it then they are free to stop at any point”.